News

New Paper on Huntington’s Disease

Feb. 27, 2017

ISB researchers and colleagues from several institutes published a new study today in Human Molecular Genetics. The key points of the study “High resolution time-course mapping of early transcriptomic, molecular and cellular phenotypes in Huntington’s disease CAG knock-in mice across multiple genetic backgrounds” are:

  • A multi-institute collaboration mapped in high resolution the earliest effects of the Huntington’s disease mutation in mice.
  • The study included four different genetic strains of mice which allowed the researchers to observe differences in the rate of mutation-induced changes as a result of genetic background
  • Mapping early HD pathogenesis expands our understanding of early disease transitions and will inform other studies on proximal mechanisms and how to slow the disease process.

READ THE FULL SUMMARY

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