News

Scientific Wellness Meets Personalized Nutrition

Dr. Lee Hood, ISB president, and Nathan Price, ISB associate director, have joined the scientific advisory board of the newly launched Habit, which will begin to offer personalized nutrition plans based on your biology. From a recent Fast Company article:

Neil Grimmer’s new startup, called Habit, aims to help others achieve their goals, whether it’s to lose weight or sleep more soundly. The company, which is launching in January, offers a $299 blood test to screen for 60 biomarkers, including amino acids, vitamin levels, and blood sugar, as well as some genetic variants that may play a role in how an individual responds to diet. The company is also attempting to test a users’ metabolic rate through a “challenge,” which involves drinking a milkshake-like beverage to understand how they respond to fats, carbs and sugars, and then sending in another set of blood tests. Read more…

 

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