News

Learning from microalgae as ‘biofactories’

In a newly published research, former members of the Price lab Saheed Imam and Sascha Schäuble, in collaboration with the Baliga lab, share discoveries from their studies of Chlamydomonas reinhardtiiChlamy for short. What follows is a short excerpt:

To the casual observer, algae may appear to be a nuisance. But for researchers, photosynthetic microalgae and other microbes have the potential to become sustainable biofactories that can economically produce renewable biofuels and a wide variety of other valuable commodities. One such group of microalgae is Chlamydomonas reinhardtiiChlamy for short. In an effort to better understand the gene regulatory and metabolic networks of this single-celled alga, researchers at Institute for Systems Biology studied the changes in Chlamy’s genetics and metabolism that cause them to capture and store carbon dioxide.

Read the full article on the ISB website…

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