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Science, tech, design & food converge at reThinkFood conference

ISB Associate Director Dr. Nathan Price participated in the panel discussion “Revolutions in Healthcare: Impacts on the Future of the Food Industry” during the reThinkFood conference at The Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley. The panelists each gave a short talk about his/her respective interests and then sat down to a discussion. It was an interesting intersection of perspectives from Kevin Slavin (MIT Media Lab), Molly Maloof (Physician Entrepreneur), Ian Peikon (Google X), Nathan Price (ISB/Arivale) and Shireen Yates (6SensorLabs).

Nathan’s presentation starts at the 27:44 mark.

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