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Dr. Nathan Price at the Vancouver Bioinformatics Users Group 2012: “Integrated modeling of metabolic and regulatory networks”

In this presentation at the the Vancouver Bioinformatics Users Group from 2012, Nathan Price  discusses approaches for the creation of quantitative systems models that can harness the power of genomics, by linking genotype to phenotype. The talk focuses particularly on automated methods for integrating metabolic and regulatory networks, such as Probabilistic Regulation of Metabolism (PROM) (Chandrasekaran and Price, PNAS, 2010). PROM is notable in that it represents the successful integration of a top-down reconstructed, statistically inferred regulatory network with a bottom-up reconstructed, biochemically detailed metabolic network, bridging two important classes of systems biology models that are rarely combined quantitatively. A strategy to curate the inference of regulatory interactions from high throughput data using metabolic networks is discussed—providing multiple layers of biological context to the problem of regulation. Finally, an approach for building tissue and cell type specific metabolic models is also presented, applied to 131 different cell types and tissues in the human body.

The Vancouver Bioinformatics Users Group (VanBUG) is an association of Bioinformatics enthusiast in the B.C. Lower Mainland, Canada.

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