News

WRF gifts $2M to ISB to advance P4 Medicine

PRESS RELEASE from Washington Research Foundation:

Sept. 30, 2015, Seattle –– Washington Research Foundation (WRF), which supports groundbreaking technology in the life sciences, physical sciences and information sciences in Washington State, announced today that it will provide the Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) with $2 million in funding to bring increased research power to Seattle, and help place this community at the center of the coming transformation of the health care
system. The funding will help accelerate ISB’s P4 biomedical research, which is catalyzing a new industry – scientific wellness – and establish Seattle as its epicenter. P4 medicine is predictive, preventive,
personalized and participatory and has two central thrusts – quantifying wellness and demystifying disease. The current healthcare industry focuses 98 percent of its efforts and resources on addressing disease. In contrast, P4 medicine will enable the quantification of wellness and promises a revolution in the healthcare system – from a focus on disease to a focus on wellness. This has the potential to save the healthcare systems billions of dollars.

Read full press release…

Recent Articles

  • COCOA Trial Results Show Diet, Exercise Help Some with Dementia

    The recently completed, ISB-led Coaching for Cognition in Alzheimer’s (COCOA) trial shows that diet and exercise can help people suffering from dementia. Senior Research Scientist Dr. Jared Roach discussed the findings in a Research Roundtable presentation.

  • Bringing DNA Sequencing to the High School Classroom

    Christopher Lausted and Dr. Danielle Vermaak were featured guests of an ISB Research Roundtable presentation. The husband-and-wife team detailed the planning and rollout of a DNA sequencing curriculum project that was tested in Vermaak’s Lincoln High School science classroom in Seattle.

  • Risk Factors for Severe COVID-19 in Hospitalized Adults Differ by Age

    A just-published study provides new information about which hospitalized COVID-19 patients are most likely to need mechanical ventilation or to die. The ISB-led work shows that vital signs and lab results at the time of hospital admission are the most accurate predictors of disease severity, more so than comorbidities and demographics.