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WRF gifts $2M to ISB to advance P4 Medicine

PRESS RELEASE from Washington Research Foundation:

Sept. 30, 2015, Seattle –– Washington Research Foundation (WRF), which supports groundbreaking technology in the life sciences, physical sciences and information sciences in Washington State, announced today that it will provide the Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) with $2 million in funding to bring increased research power to Seattle, and help place this community at the center of the coming transformation of the health care
system. The funding will help accelerate ISB’s P4 biomedical research, which is catalyzing a new industry – scientific wellness – and establish Seattle as its epicenter. P4 medicine is predictive, preventive,
personalized and participatory and has two central thrusts – quantifying wellness and demystifying disease. The current healthcare industry focuses 98 percent of its efforts and resources on addressing disease. In contrast, P4 medicine will enable the quantification of wellness and promises a revolution in the healthcare system – from a focus on disease to a focus on wellness. This has the potential to save the healthcare systems billions of dollars.

Read full press release…

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